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16

Sep

selva:
A displaced Pakistani woman sits with her child as they wait for transport home to the Swat Valley, in Karachi, Pakistan, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009. more than 2 million have fled their homes. (AP Photo/Fareed Khan)

selva:

A displaced Pakistani woman sits with her child as they wait for transport home to the Swat Valley, in Karachi, Pakistan, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009. more than 2 million have fled their homes. 
(AP Photo/Fareed Khan)

15

Sep

loveyourchaos:
A Pakistani child looks on as women covered with burqas from the tribal region of Bajur and Mohmand agency wait to be registered at the Jalozai refugee camp near Peshawar, Pakistan, Friday, Jan. 30. More than 200,000 people have fled the fighting in Bajur and Mohmand agency to camps in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

loveyourchaos:

A Pakistani child looks on as women covered with burqas from the tribal region of Bajur and Mohmand agency wait to be registered at the Jalozai refugee camp near Peshawar, Pakistan, Friday, Jan. 30. More than 200,000 people have fled the fighting in Bajur and Mohmand agency to camps in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

13

Sep

redguard:
Dinner at the Chipshop with Rita, Dru, Tina and Ripley!
 what a beautiful family!

redguard:

Dinner at the Chipshop with Rita, Dru, Tina and Ripley!

 what a beautiful family!

11

Sep

saltnvinegar:

Our makeshift musolla at the office, ‘asar prayer 11th Sept 09.
This year’s iftar at the office feels a whole lot more…fulfilling. Maybe it is the vibe off from the set up, the whole ‘the more the merrier’ philosophy. Plus, we have a cool imam for the night prayers.
Alhamdulillah, food was good. Company was good. Best programme thus far (for me lah).

saltnvinegar:

Our makeshift musolla at the office, ‘asar prayer 11th Sept 09.

This year’s iftar at the office feels a whole lot more…fulfilling. Maybe it is the vibe off from the set up, the whole ‘the more the merrier’ philosophy. Plus, we have a cool imam for the night prayers.

Alhamdulillah, food was good. Company was good. Best programme thus far (for me lah).

ihatethismess:

A mother and daughter look out of the window as they watch anti muslim protestors being arrested by the police in Harrow, North London on September 11, 2009. Riot police intervened to quell clashes between Muslims and anti-Islamic extremists protesting outside a London mosque on the anniversary of the September 11 attacks. AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)

ihatethismess:

A mother and daughter look out of the window as they watch anti muslim protestors being arrested by the police in Harrow, North London on September 11, 2009. Riot police intervened to quell clashes between Muslims and anti-Islamic extremists protesting outside a London mosque on the anniversary of the September 11 attacks. AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)

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10

Sep

guerrillamamamedicine:

digitalbin:

loveyourchaos:

somerset:

loki1181:
http://greeneyedharpy.deviantart.com/art/The-Blue-City-II-92233018

09

Sep

some clarity

because this has been hotly debated by people with their own agenda:

  • no, this blog is not going to feature muslim women who don’t wear hijab
  • this blog is intended, as stated over to left side of this post, to showcase the variety of muslim women who are misunderstood and attacked because of the way they dress, which applies to those who wear, in some form or fashion, an interpretation of hijab and/or niqab
  • this does not mean that i have an issue with muslim women who don’t wear hijab or that i am making any kind of statement about whether they are “real” or “good” muslims or not.
  • nor does this mean that i think all muslim women who choose to wear hijab/niqab are “good” muslims per se.
  • clothing is just clothing. it may or may not reflect the heart of a person. there are some very excellent/high character muslim women who do not wear hijab. i disagree with them, but i respect them, and i know that a headscarf does not make or break a woman’s iman. there are also women who cover but are lacking in so many of the truest islamic characteristics.
  • this blog is not about making a statement against sisters that don’t cover, nor is it about elevating sisters who do. it is merely about showing covered muslim women in our wide range of styles, cultures, colors, and hopefully showing us out enjoying life and being a part of society.
  • the goal of showing covered women out in daily life, everywhere, is so that those who are not familiar with covered muslim styles will become a little more familiar. this way when they see a covered woman in real life, they will not be frightened or confused. they say exposure helps to enlighten people, and that is the premise this is based on. of course, one must have an open mind and heart to be enlightened, but this is just a small attempt.
  • another possible value to a blog like this is that it may encourage muslim women to try different styles of hijab/niqab. and that it may help to encourage muslim women who don’t cover due to fear to see that there are many of us out in society who cover despite sharing those fears.
  • this blog’s purpose isn’t to say that there are only one “kind” of “real muslim” women or to imply that all muslim women cover and anyone who doesn’t isn’t muslim. this blog isn’t about an “us vs them” mentality and in-fighting between muslim women. it’s just about showing covered, active muslim women and that we are everywhere, everyday. 
  • this blog isn’t about giving anyone a platform. i have no intention of making any more wordy posts. the point of the blog is pictures, so you won’t be hearing much, if any, commentary from me. the fact that i believe in hijab is beside the point.
  • reality is that women who wear hijab/niqab are the muslims who stand out and are discriminated against and often put in danger. fact is that the women who do not wear hijab are not the muslims that non-muslims fear and loathe. so it would be rather pointless, in my opinion, to show non-hijab-wearing muslim women just to point out their existence and request that the dominant society “accept” them and let them live in peace. they are already part of the dominant in that regard.
  • there are blogs and magazines that do an excellent job of including non-hijab wearing muslimahs and i commend them for the work they do.
  • there are also other blogs that are specific to hijab-wearing sisters, and i’ve never known anyone who took offense to their existence. and yet those blogs rarely if ever feature a sister in face-veil, which is one of my goals with this blog.
  • for those who take issue with the title of this blog not specifying that it is only showcasing “covered muslim women”, i think the title is hardly that important, nor is it claiming to showcase “all” muslim women. but due to some extremely obnoxious assumptions that have been made about me, and strong sentiments that the blog title must be more specific, the title has changed. there will, however, be no more bullying done by those with issues that they want to take out on me. the purpose of this blog is clearly laid out, and pretty simple. if you like it, that’s great, and if you don’t, that’s fine.

welcome to those who come, peace to those who leave.

08

Sep

veiled women at (unspecified) sufi shrine (via JamalElias, original copyright Kara Kamera)

veiled women at (unspecified) sufi shrine (via JamalElias, original copyright Kara Kamera)

women at (unspecified) sufi shrine (via JamalElias, original copyright Kara Kamera)

women at (unspecified) sufi shrine (via JamalElias, original copyright Kara Kamera)

zanzibar style (via rbleib)

zanzibar style (via rbleib)